The conflict in South Sudan spread to the formally-peaceful Greater Equatoria region last year, causing mass displacement. Many left for neighbouring Uganda, whilst some fled to the relative safety of Juba. This influx of Internally Displaced People (IDPs) to the capital city has placed a large strain on resources and services, including schools. In many schools, facilities are stretched to the max.

The Head Teacher of Juba Day Secondary School, George Kenyi, has welcomed in a large number of IDP children under the belief that "all children must go to school". BBC Media Action radio producer, Catherine, went to the school to speak to students about the sudden strain placed on the school.

A pupil at Juba Day Secondary School sits on the fringes of the classroom due to limited space

A pupil at Juba Day Secondary School sits on the fringes of the classroom due to limited space



Catherine also spoke to a student at Juba Day SS, Grace, who was recently displaced from Kajo Keji. When she arrived in Juba, she was desperate to get back to school to learn and enrolled as fast as she could. She appreciates the warm welcome offered by the school, but she's aware of the lack of resources that are affecting the quality of teaching and learning. She noted that some people sit outside the classroom because there is no space inside, and that there is an acute lack of gender-segregated toilets, so she often has to use the boys toilet, which makes her feel uncomfortable.

BBC Media Action Producer, Catherine, interviews Grace

BBC Media Action Producer, Catherine, interviews Grace



This radio show was produced in Juba Arabic as part of the Our School series, which has been broadcast weekly across South Sudan since April 2014. The show is now broadcasting on 29 local and national stations in 9 languages. Our School highlights the benefits of girls staying in school, and offers advice on solving practical challenges such as travelling to school safely and budgeting for school fees. Interviewees act as role models who explain why education is important to them, and how they overcome obstacles. The radio programme also acts as an interactive feedback platform, with presenters inviting listeners to send text messages and call into open phone-line discussions to discuss their own education experiences.

This radio show will soon be uploaded onto our website. Until then, you can listen to previous episodes, and read the corresponding English script, here.

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