Hon. Minister of the Ministry of General Education and Instruction (MoGEI), Deng Deng Hoc Yai, announced that enrolment recorded on the School Attendance Monitoring System (SAMS - www.sssams.org) passed 1.5 million on 18th May. It is now standing at almost 1.6 million. Data from SAMS shows that schools are opening earlier in the year, with more time to cover the syllabus.

This record has been achieved despite the consequences of conflict that have left four million displaced, and more than half the population food insecure. In some locations in Greater Upper Nile, schools are reopening, or opening for the first time after protracted conflict. These positive steps forward show the remarkable commitment of South Sudanese people to education.

Photo credit: Bruno Feder



  The Ministry of General Education and Instruction thanks partners - this achievement reflects positive partnerships between MoGEI and GESS and UK Aid, IMPACT and the European Union, UNICEF and its funders, including the Governments of the United States, Norway and Japan, the Global Partnership for Education, NGOs and faith-based and private education providers.

Based on an analysis of enrolment patterns and number of admission registers and school budgets received, it is now expected that Academic Year 2018 enrolment will reach 1.7m pupils, reporting from 3,800 schools across the country.

There has also been a positive trend in female student enrolment; as of 18th May, girls made up a record proportion of total enrolment, currently at 45.87%, compared to 39.96% in 2014. However, there is still a lot to achieve and we cannot afford to leave girls behind if sustainable economic development is to take place.

Akuja de Garang MBE, GESS Team Leader, said: “Learning is more than enrolment and attendance at school: I was delighted that this year’s Primary and Secondary Exam results set records in terms of pass rates, but we know there is much more to do, to make sure all pupils can complete, and succeed in, their education – for example, why do relatively so many more girls than boys drop out during P8?”

“Schools are crucial to maintaining the social fabric in crisis. The current GESS programme is ending in the next few months, but UK Aid have announced a five year “Girls’ Education  

South Sudan 2” programme that will build on what has been achieved, and move forward to make sure all the pupils GESS has supported to stay in upper primary can keep going in secondary.”

There is a strong commitment to making sure we have the most accurate enrolment information to support management action. Monitoring & evaluation teams keep a close eye on the data that comes in and follow up attempts of over-reporting. If you see anything that doesn’t look right, please cooperate and contact the Ministry, in confidence, on 0928341727.

“Schools are crucial to maintaining the social fabric in crisis. The current GESS programme is ending in the next few months, but UK Aid have announced a four year “Girls’ Education South Sudan 2” programme that will build on what has been achieved, and move forward to make sure all the pupils GESS has supported to stay in upper primary can keep going in secondary.”

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